Can Holiness Pervade Your Office and Your Kitchen? Part 1

I read recently about a person who discovered that he should drink 16 glasses of water a day. The next morning he brought to his office a large pitcher filled with water. Throughout the day that pitcher on his desk frequently reminded him of his need, and he’d pour another glass and drink. Overall, it was a positive experience—other than having to go to the bathroom 27 times in a period of eight hours. Remaining hydrated, he learned from that experience, requires intentionality. He had to stop periodically in the midst of his busyness, become aware of his body’s need for liquid, and take a few moments to drink a glass of water.  It was amazing how helpful having that pitcher of water in front of him all day was to his intention of drinking more water.

Intentionality is a huge piece of what makes people effective and successful – setting intentions and then determining a specific course of action to accomplish those intentions.  It applies to every area of life, right?  We intentionalize what we desire, what we can and what we have control over, and then hold it all with an open hand, recognizing that sometimes the best things that happen do happen as surprises.  However, intentionality is an important value.  And what helps our intentions become reality are the tangible reminders we put in front of ourselves regularly of what we’re trying and wanting to do – finding ways to integrate our intentions with the rest of our lives.

Dr. Susan Smalley, a professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Biobehavioral Sciences at UCLA, posted an article in the Huffington Post last week in which she tries to understand some of the  reasons India ranks so much higher than the United States on the Happiness Index (especially considering the comparative massive economic disparity and rampant poverty in India).  The Happy Planet Index (whose most recent compilation came out in July 2009)  strips the view of the economy back to its absolute basics:  what we put in (resources), and what comes out (human lives of different length and happiness).  Its the first ever index “to combine environmental impact with well-being to measure the environmental efficiency with which country by country, people live sustainable, long and happy/meaningful  lives.”  That’s the way they define it.  The resulting global index of the 143 nations reveals some interesting comparisons.

So after just returning from her first trip to India, she reflects on her experience of its culture and posits a significant observation.  First of all, she defines spirituality as “a sense of connection to something larger than oneself.”  And then, recognizing recent research that shows that spirituality positively impacts health and well-being, she describes her experience in India:

“In India this attention to spirituality is pervasive.  It is evident in every aspect of the culture – there is constant integration of reminders that we are part of something larger than the self … in the shrines present on every street corner, sides of houses, roadside stops, hilltops, alleyways, back of tractor trailers, and beyond.  Shrines are big, small, colorful, bland, dedicated to Shiva, Ganesh, Hanuman, or thousands of other manifestations of our shared nature, to Hindus the manifestations of a Oneness or God or an Ultimate Reality.  It is evident in the pervasive Namaste – a greeting with hand folded in a prayer position accompanied by a bow that means something like ‘I see the Oneness in you.’  It is evident in the pervasive ‘bindi,’ the smudge of color between the eyebrow – a reminder that we are part of something larger than the self – visible by a ‘third eye’ if you will … I am so impressed with the complete integration of spiritual development into daily life.  Being surrounded by constant reminders of our connectedness and dependent nature make emotions and actions stemming from self-centeredness more difficult to come by.”

In contrast here in the West, we tend to compartmentalize our time for spiritual practice if we engage in any at all – once a week in spiritual gatherings, or a specific meditation time each day, or at religious Holidays, or prayer at meals.  Other than these moments, the rest of our lives is rarely surrounded by spiritual reminders or awareness.  Our passion to separate Church from State, our carefulness to maintain distinction and distance between the spiritual and the secular, has led to an overly heightened sense of individuality and independence and self-importance.  Our worldviews have gradually narrowed through the decades from cosmos to planet to nation to city to neighborhood to self, with whatever happening to self carrying the ultimate significance and importance.

This reality, suggests Dr. Smalley, helps to explain some of the difference between India and the U.S. on the Happiness Index – it’s about how pervasive spirituality is in everyday life.

The point is, the journey of spirituality (and a corresponding sense of well-being and happiness) don’t simply happen by chance.  It takes intentionality and thought and discipline.  It takes structuring our lives around tangible reminders of our connection “to something larger than ourselves.”  It takes decompartmentalizing our lives and integrating spirituality into the flow of daily existence.  It means allowing the divine to incarnate itself into the fiber and fabric of our lives.  It means engaging in specific activities, tangible reminders, intentional words, visual – auditory – kinesthetic experiences.

So what would it look like to make spirituality a way of life for me?  What intentional ways do I build into my day to be reminded of transcendence?  How intentional are I about living life deeply and with greater awareness and enlightenment?

STAY TUNED TO PART 2:  What are some tangible ways to facilitate a more pervasive spirituality?

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5 thoughts on “Can Holiness Pervade Your Office and Your Kitchen? Part 1

  1. I just started reading The Geography of Bliss, about a guy visiting different countries to determine what makes them happier, or unhappier. It’s actually really interesting! Your blog post reminded me of that. 🙂
    Thanks for the good read!

    • Thanks, Katrina! I read that book, too – fascinating premise and exploration! You would enjoy checking out happyplanetindex.org – interesting paradigm and discoveries. We Americans have a lot to learn! 🙂

  2. being an indian i must tell u that things are not so good as you portray . People follow them as rituals without even bothered to know the meaning & significance… not because of spirituality.

  3. Thank you, ds, for your comment. You are certainly describing one of our human realities – how easy it is for any of us, no matter where we grow up, no matter what our spiritual or religious culture, and no matter how meaningful all of that might be, to take life for granted, to get so caught up in ritual that we lose the significance. That’s why intentionality is so important for all of us. Thanks for your honesty and perspective.

  4. I required to thank you for this great read!! I am emphatically relishing every little bit of this. I’ve you bookmarked to find out fresh stuff you blog post.

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