Dealing With the Fear Of Taking the Risk To Be Alive

“Death is not the biggest fear we have; our biggest fear is taking the risk to be alive – the risk to be alive and express what we really are.” Don Miguel Ruiz

I spent some time this morning at the Federal Building for Immigration downtown San Francisco supporting one of my gay friends, a dear colleague in ministry and one of our leaders of Second Wind.  He appeared in front of an immigration judge this morning to tell his story in order to apply for legal asylum here in the States.  His request is based upon the real dangers of being gay in the religious subculture he lived and worked all of his adult life within in his home country.  When he emerged from the court room with his lawyer and we debriefed the experience, I asked him what it felt like to retell his story in great detail.  “It was cathartic in many ways but also very painful – remembering all the awful things I encountered when I came out as gay:  the ostracization from my church community, the loss of my pastoral occupation and reputation, my marriage, the pain for everyone including my kids who had to put up with ridicule from their friends and others, living with the fear of rejection every day, often experiencing it in painful ways.  But I feel good about how clearly and openly I told my story to the judge.”  His son was there to speak to the judge on behalf of his father, too.  “I want for us both to be able to live here in this country and build our lives here,” he told me.

Now my friend (along with his long time committed partner) waits for two weeks to hear the immigration judge’s verdict.  And we wait with them as their friends and spiritual community who love them and are committed to the journey of life together.

And I’m reminded of the great courage and bravery he’s manifesting to take the risk to be genuinely alive, the risk to express who he really is in spite of the consequences he’s both faced and continues having to put up with even in this country.  I admire him for his honesty and his integrity to live with transparency and congruity.

It’s not easy choosing to be alive and really live life in alignment and integration.  It takes risks.  We have to encounter our fears.  We have to be willing to fail from time to time but then to pick ourselves up and keep moving forward.  It’s not easy.

Have you ever asked yourself what your biggest fears are to living the life you feel deep inside you’re called to live?  What does the cage look like that might tend to keep you from being really alive?

Maybe that’s why in my work with people I encounter so many who are simply trying to survive, to make it to death safely, not pushing the edges of their lives, simply maintaining the status quo.  It’s easier that way – it appears less risky.  But notice I say “appears” because in actuality, it’s more risky.  When you live your life out of alignment, not being who you really, trying to live someone else’s life instead of your own, when you’re not living your calling and purpose, settling instead for status quo, your inner spirit and physical body pick up on this lack of congruity and create what we call dis-ease – a restlessness inside, a lack of ease.  Experts remind us that this condition is a condition of stress.  And when you live with this state of stress for a long time it becomes chronic.  And chronic stress has been shown to be terribly debilitating to the body, leading to a susceptibility to disease and illness on multiple levels, including depression.  Our human systems are designed to experience maximum status when there’s complete alignment between our emotions, our feelings, our thoughts, and our behaviors – when we’re living within the integrity of our true selves, when we’re using how we’re wired with boldness and confidence and purpose.

As I listened to my friend’s lawyer giving a thumbnail sketch of the process this morning and where it goes from here, I felt deep admiration for her as a professional who is so committed to helping people enjoy the opportunity to live life deeply and freely in this country.  I was reminded of the profound statement of mission and purpose Jesus stated when he began his ministry.  He quoted from Isaiah 61, applying the mission of God to himself:  “God’s Spirit has anointed me and chosen me to bring freedom and liberation to the captives, to proclaim this as the year of God’s redemption and favor for all.”

In my opinion, this powerful and professional lawyer who is helping our friend and all her other clients has stepped into the legacy of the great prophets of old and Jesus himself who came to give all people the joy of freedom and liberation to be alive, really alive.

Filming the event this morning was another of my friends here in the City.  He and his wife (both leaders in our Second Wind spiritual community) are producing a documentary about gays who are trying to reconcile their sexual identity with their religious and spiritual orientation.  These two courageous people are sacrificing everything they have to travel the country (carrying their 20 month old daughter along) filming stories to highlight this tremendous need.  They, too, have stepped into the legacy of Jesus’ mission of announcing the freedom and liberation to be alive, really alive, for all people.  I admire their persistent passion and boldness.

It takes courage to take the risk to be alive no matter what your orientation – “the risk to be alive and express what we really are.”  This isn’t about sexuality.  It’s about being human on every level.  We all face it.  And it’s risky business.  We have to take intentional steps forward every day, choosing to live deeply and purposefully instead of letting the days go by without any thought or awareness or momentum.  It’s about choosing to live our God-given life, not someone else’s.

But in the end, for those who are willing to take that risk for themselves and on behalf of others, the reward of living in alignment, of living with purpose and mission, of choosing courage and boldness instead of fear and intimidation will far outweigh the risks.  There’s certainly stress in taking risks.  But this kind of stress – eustress – always trumps distress!  It’s actually good for you.

I love the way George Bernard Shaw describes this kind of life.  This is the way I want to live.  This kind of life is the highest level of spirituality and it produces the most profound kind of transformation possible (Jesus’ life showed this to be true).  Here it is:

“This is the true joy in life, the being used for a purpose recognized by yourself as a might one; the being a force of nature instead of a feverish, selfish little clod of ailments and grievances, complaining that the world will not devote itself to making you happy.

“I am of the opinion that my life belongs to the whole community, and as long as I live it is my privilege to do for it whatever I can.

“I want to be thoroughly used up when I die, for the harder I work, the more I live.  I rejoice in life for its own sake.  Life is no brief candle to me; it is a sort of splendid torch which I have got hold of for the moment, and I want to make it burn as brightly as possible before handing it on to future generations.”

So here’s to taking the risk of being alive and expressing what we really are, for our sakes and for others and for Life itself!

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4 thoughts on “Dealing With the Fear Of Taking the Risk To Be Alive

  1. Thanks for coming today Greg! I know it meant a lot to everyone who was there. I appreciate you having the courage and authenticity to speak up (and show up) for friends who deserve to be liberated from fear, anger, and oppression. We hope the film will help others to break through the silence that makes it so difficult for communities to be places of healing and unconditional love.

  2. Your support and friendship is so important to me, Greg and I am so blessed to have you and Shasta by our side, to have Stephen and Daneen, Manisha and others so close. People who care and share the burden, who is empathetic with things that understand and absolutely respectful with things that don’t understand. Apparently living a life in alignment is a more difficult way, but it is certainly the shorter to get in a place where you can find peace within.

  3. Living free is the way God meant us to live. You have mentioned so many courageous people to admire, and that includes you, too! Love the quote from GBS.

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