Healthy Friendship, Undistorted Mirrors, and Spiritual Growth

Woman Holding Blank FrameDuring a time of great crisis in my life, my therapist said to me,

“Remember Greg, other people’s reactions to you say more about their story than about yours.”

I’ve never forgotten that advice.  I’ve certainly seen it to be true over and over again.  And it’s helped me stay focused and centered and grounded on my truth … most of the time.

You need to remember this, too, whenever people choose to respond to you in judgmental or critical ways because you’ve done something or said something they disagree with or oppose.  One of the lessons we learn in life is that people tend to see us through the lens of their own self concept.  They actually are judging themselves vicariously through us.

We are often loved and admired for who people choose to think we are or need us to be rather than who we really are.  And conversely, we are often rejected or snubbed not for who we really are but for who they see us to be and whether we’ve lived up or not to their projected image of us.

Either way, we are being responded to from their own personal needs not our own.  It’s a false self and image.  They’re not holding up an undistorted mirror for us to see ourselves as we really are.  They’re holding up a picture they’ve painted of us.  And it’s destructive to us if we base our self worth on an illusion.

I love the way Richard Rohr, in his book Falling Upward, puts it:

“Beauty or ugliness really is first of all in the eye of the beholder.  Good people will mirror goodness in us, which is why we love them so much.  Not-so-mature people will mirror their own unlived and confused life onto us, which is why they confuse and confound us so much, and why they are so hard to love.”  (p. 153)

For this reason, as Rohr emphasizes, it is a necessity for us to find at least one undistorted mirror that reveals our inner, deepest, and yes, divine image:  a loving, honest friend to help ground us by how they see us in our truth and accept us for our truth.

A Spiritual Dimension of Friendship

This is truly one of the deep spiritual dimensions of friendship and human relationship.  Healthy friendship holds a mirror in front of us so we can see ourselves undistorted, the way we truly are, who we really are.  And that friend who holds the mirror for us says to us, “Whatever you see in this mirror, I love.  I accept you the way you truly are—the real you, not some false image of you that either I or others might project, or even you might project on yourself.  I love and accept You.”

I have a friend just like that.  He and I have been on our friendship journey for 15 years or so.  We have talked on the phone or in person whenever we can be together almost every week of those 15 years.  He has held the mirror in front of me through the highs and lows of my life, reminding me of who I really am, no matter how others have responded to me.  That mirror has revealed some ugly things that I tend to shrink away from, as well as some beautiful things I’m drawn to.  But through it all, he has loved, accepted, and affirmed me for who I really am beyond all the externals I and others tend to fixate on.  And that has helped empower my own growth into the person I truly am and want to be.

Rohr makes the observation that

“it is only whose who respond to the real you, good or bad, that help you in the long run” (p. 153).  This is the only kind of love that ever redeems.

That’s why my friend Paul has been so empowering and transforming to me through all these years.  Together, we have learned and practiced how to see each other through the lens of our deepest core truth.  And this authentic sight has been instrumental in growing us both spiritually, relationally, and individually.

This is the way God has modeled friendship with us.

“Like any true mirror, the gaze of God receives us exactly as we are, without judgment or distortion, subtraction or addition.  Such perfect receiving is what transforms us.  Being totally received as we truly are is what we wait and long for all our lives.  All we can do is receive and return the loving gaze of God every day, and afterwards we will be internally free and deeply happy at the same time.  The One who knows all has no trouble including, accepting, and forgiving all.  Soon we who are gazed upon so perfectly can pass on the same accepting gaze to all others who need it.  There is no longer any question ‘Does he or she deserve it?'”  (Ibid., pp. 159-60)

My friend Paul continues to give God’s gift of perfect receiving to me time and again.  I hope I can do the same for him.  After all, it’s our deepest human longing and desire—to be loved, accepted, and perfectly received no matter what.  Isn’t it?

Are you that kind of friend to someone else?  Do you have this kind of undistorted mirror in your own life?  Is your view of God/the Universe one of perfect receiving of you, who you really are, with no judgment, only acceptance—that you belong here in this world in all of your authentic being—that you truly matter?

Please note: I reserve the right to delete comments that are offensive or off-topic.

11 thoughts on “Healthy Friendship, Undistorted Mirrors, and Spiritual Growth

  1. Greg, this is such good stuff. The role our relationships play in our personal growth is so critical. It’s hard for me, as someone who struggles to make friendships, but I know (and have seen) it’s power. Thanks for the reminder.

    • Thanks, Marc! I continue to realize how important it is for how we choose to show up for each other and what role we play in each other’s lives for good or ill. Blessings to you, friend!

  2. I have been setting my mind and intention on connection to friends (in various ways) throughout this month. This is a beautiful message to be reminded of as I embark on many new relationships that have come into my life through my openness. I also recently wrote about friendship with ourselves as one of the overlooked friendships. I love how it all resonates.

    • Thanks for your comments! Blessings to you as you act on such beautiful intentions for yourself this month and beyond. May you experience all the joy and meaning that your heart desires as you both give and receive in these friendships.

  3. I enjoyed this article so much and I agree with everything you say here. It has been my recent experience that such kind of friends also help heal your self image and allows for the divine in each one of us to truly, finally get through and we can accept this unconditional love as we learn to appreciate who we really are and shed the idea of who we think we are supposed to be.
    What a gift from a friend!!!
    Miriam

  4. Profound thanks Greg for your transformational friendship to me. You have mirrored my truth to me authentically for over two decades. Amazing how time flies! What a gift you are to all of us who read your blog as you share significant spiritual insights time after time. We can’t wait to see what you write next!

    • Thanks, Paul! What a wonderful journey we’ve enjoyed together. Wouldn’t trade it for anything.

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